Hunt Report

The juniors are our future–if they survive

So although the majority of the formal season was a wash for me from December to February (lameness, extreme cold, travel, more extreme cold plus extreme rain), we’re finishing out the season well. Last weekend we hunted from what I’ve always been told is one of our best jumping fixtures–but being a fairly new member, I have only hunted from there a handful of times, and each time, it’s been a pretty slow day without jumping (except once when I whipped in and jumped a few old, small coops). That was not the case last Saturday–and it made for a day full of everything I love about hunting.

High winds all week had basically dried out the ground after an extremely rainy stretch, which made the footing good, but also meant there were a fair number of downed trees. This was also good, because it made for more jumping!

We jumped a bunch of small logs on the ground and hanging logs of medium size, no problem. I was so pleased with the Leftist. All of the dressage and walking that I’ve been forced to do all winter, bringing him back from his long abscess vacation, is really paying off. Rather than walk–huge jerky trot–BALLS TO THE WALL GALLOP, now I have a nice trot and canter added to the mix. It’s nice!!

This day I had a junior to look out for. Her adult chaperone was delayed by truck problems, so I offered to let her ride with me. She’s a great rider so I was not worried about that–more just the whole idea of being responsible for someone’s child! I kept looking back every time we had a little gallop or a jump, and thankfully each time she was still there. She loves to hunt and it is so cool to see animals, adults and kids all enjoying the same thing.

Everything was going well until we got to a bunch of downed branches right at the edge of the woods and a field…at a canter. By the time I saw it, I had no time to slow down. Lefty plowed on through, turned smartly to the left and galloped on. I looked over my shoulder. The branches, formerly on the ground, were stuck straight up in the air. Lefty had kicked them up right into the face of the horse behind me…and my charge was hanging halfway off said horse, her shoulders on its neck. “STAND UP!” I yelled. Not exactly a formal position they teach you, but it got the message across and she got her shoulders up and seat back in the saddle. “You did it!” I called as we galloped on. Not much time to really congratulate her, but that’s hunting.

I know at her age (actually, even now!) I would have scarcely believed I had emerged from such a close call at speed. There’s always a progression of feelings for me: shock, disbelief, and self-congratulatory awe. I was just glad my not-so-careful riding didn’t go as badly as it could have. We didn’t have to deliver my charge home in a body bag.

The other highlight of the day was a sizeable coop! Probably about 3’6.” My first thought was, “Oh. That looks big.” Then I consciously tried to banish that thought because it has not served me well before. Look across the jump. Leg on. LOOK! Two point. Leg ON!  And we sailed over with plenty of airtime and galloped on, scratching Lefty’s neck to praise him. I was soooo happy with him!

Then of course, another junior on a medium pony sailed right over it too. No big deal I guess when you’re a fearless kid on the wonder pony!

The adults toasted with celebratory port. I offered my junior charge a celebratory granola bar, but she declined. (Probably for the best because it’s been in my sandwich case for two years.)

After we hacked in, I slid out of my saddle and immediately felt it. All the chiropractic work I had done around November and December–gone. My shoulder burned and my right hip ached. Oh well. I had to wash the mud off my horse before I could even really think about it, and all pains are eased at the hunt breakfast table. The sidesaddle girls went all out with champagne in actual flutes (fancy). I dug right into the venison sausage and cheese, clutching my Miller Lite (hydrating).

A well behaved horse, great times in nature with friends, and some close calls, but all the horses and humans returned safely to stuff their faces. What more can you ask for?

(featured photo by Larry Schaudies. From 2017, but the same fixture on an equally cold day!)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s