Miscellaneous Shenanigans, Newbie Tips

When We’re Not Fox Chasin’, We’re Hunter Pacin’

Spring is here, and with it, the Hunter Pace circuit–a fun way to keep the good times rolling with your foxhunting friends when the season is over, or to dip a toe into the foxhunting world for the first time.

A hunter pace (also called a paper chase in some areas) is the least competitive competition of all time. I know because I’ve ridden them and done the scoring too! There’s no way to strategize, so earning a ribbon is just the cherry on top of a cross-country ride and a delicious tailgate. Of course, some people, hilariously, take it very seriously.  To me, it’s an excuse to ride out over gorgeous country and school some XC jumps with your friends.

How does a hunter pace work?

A team of 2+ riders navigates a marked course of 5-7 miles over trails and fields. The attire is “ratcatcher”–what foxhunters wear during the informal season (Tweed coat, coordinating stock tie, breeches and brown or black boots). Polo shirts or regular show attire are also typically fine, but this varies by club. There are various classes (flat, low jumps, high jumps) but the goal for each is to get as close as possible to the “optimum time”…which is not disclosed to the riders. Supposedly the optimum time represents a typical hunting pace for the country. So you have to guess when the hunt would typically gallop, or walk, or trot. Sometimes the optimum time is set by a person riding the course beforehand, and sometimes it is an average of all the times in the class (excluding the fastest and slowest times).

Either way, it’s a crap shoot in my opinion. If you hunt, you know that the pace can be widely variable depending on the conditions and scent, so…there is no such thing as a “typical hunting pace.” If the optimum time is determined by an average, you have no clue how others will ride the course. I have always found the best strategy is to just go at a pace that makes sense for an avid foxhunter. Gallop the straightaways, trot on trails with good footing, walk if footing is bad. You don’t have to jump everything if you don’t want to. You can even get lost, fall off, refuse jumps, and still win.

In fact, you will see almost all of that in this video of my most recent hunter pace (aside from falling off, thankfully!). I left in the “oops” moments just to show that even after 4 years of hunting on a regular basis–my horse is not a saint and my riding is not impeccable. It wasn’t my best ride ever and that’s ok!

You don’t have to be perfect to do a hunter pace and here is video proof!

Howard County Iron Bridge Hunter Pace: Optimum Lows

1 Minute Highlights Reel


If you’re looking to get involved in foxhunting, participating in your local hunt’s spring or fall hunter paces is a fabulous and affordable way to get started. (The Maryland Hunter Pace circuit is $25/ride.) The best part is, if you’re just getting started, you can pick your own pace and you can choose which jumps you want to try. Completely low pressure and focused on fun!

Have you participated in a hunter pace? Does it differ from how Maryland hunter paces work? Where’s your favorite course?

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