Where are you allowed to hunt in Ontario?

Some examples of county forests which allow hunting include: Simcoe, Dufferin, Wellington and Nor- thumberland. Hunters must be an OFAH member to hunt in Simcoe County forest. Provincial parks – Ontario parks cover approximately 10% of the province’s sur- face area and are managed by the MNRF.

Can you hunt anywhere in Ontario?

Hunting is permitted in a number of provincial parks in Ontario. Hunters should always check with the appropriate park office regarding areas open to hunting, species that can be hunted, seasons, and other restrictions that apply in each park. Call 1-800-387-7011 or 1-800-667-1940 for assistance.

Where can you deer hunt in Ontario?

WHITE-TAILED DEER HUNTING IN ONTARIO

  • Indian Point Camp, Dryden. Debatably the best deer-hunting destination in Canada, Dryden is the place to go for white-tailed deer in Ontario. …
  • Rainy Lake Outfitters, Fort Frances. …
  • Muskie Bay Resort, Nestor Falls. …
  • Upper Thames River Conservation Authority, London.

Can I hunt on Crown land in Ontario?

Hunting is possible on much of Ontario’s Crown Land, some Conservation Authorities, a few County Forests and a select number of Provincial Parks. Our Backroad Mapbooks, and Backroad GPS Maps are a great resource for identifying Crown Land in Ontario, as well as other areas where hunting is permitted.

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How far off the road can you hunt in Ontario?

Possession of a Loaded Firearm on a Roadway: In most of southern Ontario (south of the French and Matttawa Rivers) it is generally unlawful to have a firearm that is loaded unless the hunter is either across the fence line where one exists, or at least 8 metres from the traveled portion of the roadway where there are …

Which provincial parks can you hunt in Ontario?

Some examples of county forests which allow hunting include: Simcoe, Dufferin, Wellington and Nor- thumberland. Hunters must be an OFAH member to hunt in Simcoe County forest. Provincial parks – Ontario parks cover approximately 10% of the province’s sur- face area and are managed by the MNRF.

Is hunting allowed in Algonquin Park?

Hunting in selected areas of Algonquin Park is subject to the Ontario hunting regulations. Hunting is also permitted through a hunting agreement with Algonquin First Nation. Trapping occurs on registered traplines in selected areas of the Park.

What are the dates for deer hunting in Ontario?

Rifles, shotguns, muzzle-loading guns and bows

Wildlife Management Unit Resident – open season
25 September 18 to December 15
26 September 18 to October 31
28, 29, 31, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44 November 1 to November 13
43A, 43B November 15 to November 21

Where are the most deer in Ontario?

The Loring-Restoule Region is home to one of the largest herds of white-tailed deer in the province. Approximately 10,000 white-tailed deer spend the winter months in the Loring-Restoule area.

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How much does it cost to hunt a deer in Ontario?

Hunting fees for residents of Ontario

Resident products 2021 fee
Deer licence and tag $43.86
Farmer’s deer licence and tag $25.14
Deer draw applications No fee
Additional tag for deer (only for select Wildlife Management Units) $43.86

Is it legal to target shoot on Crown land in Ontario?

However, to legally shoot outside of a shooting range or gun club, you can’t just set up a target in your backyard. In Ontario, you’ll need to go to what’s known as crown land. … In order to make sure you are allowed to shoot a firearm on the crown land, you must use crown land that is classified as a “General Use”-area.

Can you hunt squirrels in Ontario?

A falconry licence is required to hunt with raptors native to Ontario, in addition to a valid small game licence.

Falconry seasons and limits.

Species Wildlife management unit Limits
Gray (black) and fox squirrel 5–15, 19–23, 28–50, 53–95 Combined daily limit of 5 and possession limit of 15

Can you own a deer in Ontario?

By law, you generally cannot keep wild animals captive — or release them into the wild — in Ontario. Some exceptions exist — but are regulated under provincial laws.